The Foot/Ankle:

* Out for the season: If an athlete has any one of these injuries per The MRI Report, they will be out for the season. They may require surgery to reconstruct the injured structures.

* Achilles tendon rupture
* Torn Lisfranc or Midfoot ligament
* Large unstable cartilage injury in the ankle joint
* Displaced Syndesmosis injury

* Need surgery, but may return before end of season: These athletes may need arthroscopic or minimally invasive surgery, but with speedy recovery, may return to play in same season.

* Loose intra-articular body – there is a loose bone or cartilage chip in the joint that can continue to cause inflammation and damage.
* 5th metatarsal bone fracture – X-ray will reveal fracture, but MRI scan may indicate if it is from one event or from repetitive stress.

* No immediate surgery, but may miss several weeks during season: These athletes typically will not require surgery, but may miss several weeks for recovery, and depending on time of season, may or may not make it back to play. These injuries usually require bracing  to protect the injured structure. The athletes may elect to undergo surgery if non-operative treatment is not working, and the athlete cannot get back to pre-injury form.

* Grade 3 ankle sprain – These may involve complete rupture of the medial and lateral ankle ligaments.
* High ankle sprain (Syndesmosis injury)– This injury involves a strong ligament that holds the two bones at the bottom of the leg together – the tibia and fibula – and is called the Syndesmosis. If the syndesmosis ligament is torn, this ankle sprain can last longer than a typical “bad” ankle sprain. The recovery can involve a period of non-weight bearing and take twice as long to heal. These injuries can easily sideline an athlete for the entire season.

* Foot/ankle bone contusions or bruises – These are usually caused by the bones colliding with each other with enough force to cause the bones to bleed. Like in the knee, these injures can linger from a few weeks to several months.

* Achilles tendon strain with tendonitis with possible partial tear
* Posterior tibialis tendonitis with possible partial tear
* Peroneal tendon with possible partial tear